Dating show with matchmakers

When millionaires need a date, they don't turn to Tinder or like the rest of us.

The upper crust of Silicon Valley looks to Amy Andersen, the founder and CEO of Linx Dating, an exclusive dating and social network based in San Francisco, as featured on an upcoming episode of CNBC's "The Filthy Rich Guide." Linx is a resource "for the marriage-minded," as Andersen says.

Producer Liu Yuan told Sixth Tone on Tuesday that the next episode will show the women’s families judging the men.

The show has provoked lively discussions about dating in contemporary China, with some viewers saying the program reveals the double standards for men and women, as well as the complications created by meddling parents with superficial, narrow, and materialistic ideals.

That might sound extreme, but her track record speaks for itself: Andersen can currently take credit for over 100 successful, exclusive relationships in the region, as well as countless marriages of former clients.

The bachelorette only wins the right to choose a date herself if three families voice interest in her. ” They also brutally rejected a 40-year-old divorcee and single mom. The parents on the show grilled bachelorettes with questions like “Can you do housework?(In China, divorced women are often considered damaged goods.) Some critics called the show a revival of outdated arranged marriages (link in Chinese).Many say it reflects the “Giant Infant” culture described by psychologist Wu Zhihong in her acclaimed book to be somewhat progressive.The first episode saw contestant Lin Jiali enter with a bowl of soup that she cooked herself. ” shouted contestant Zhao Haoran, 23, from the bachelors’ waiting room.

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